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Wanelo Tech Gems: we've been busy!

It's been quite some time that I've posted here, to my personal blog, so long in fact, that the publishing interface a'la Blogger now looks like MS Word. Or God forbid you remember, Word Perfect. (Yes, I am that old).

But that's not what I wanted to write about.

Wanelo, the team that I lead as a CTO, has been kicking so much ass lately, that I've just had no time documenting personal projects here, even though there have been plenty.

So to sort of catch up in one blog post at once, I wanted to put a few links to some of the great content on our technical blog, that's been recently migrated to Github Pages.

Without further ado:

Multi-process or multi-threaded design for Ruby daemons

A pretty awesome blog post by our own Eric Saxby about thinking in terms of GIL (global interpreter lock in ruby), it's impact on production environments, especially in multi-threaded environments, and where long-running processes may have impact on your database transactions. Very worthy read.

A Brief History of Sprout Wrap

This great post by James Hart talks about our usage of Sprout-Wrap to automate developer station setup, and turn it into a pretty much a four-five command process, and about an hour of automatic magic.

12-Step Program for Scaling Web Applications on PostgreSQL

By yours truly, is a deep dive into performance journey of Wanelo.com into the world of multiple thousands of requests per second, light-weight HTTP services, horizontal and vertical sharding, as well as a slew of useful tips and tricks along the way.

Finally, and most recently, 

Capistrano 3, You've Changed! (Since Version 2)

James published another detailed gem about upgrading to Capistrano 3, and iterates over some of the most interesting changes in tasks, locations, command line, rollbacks and more. If you do deployment with Capistrano you need to read this.

I'm going to do my best to keep up with what's going on, and keep this up to date. 

Perhaps I'll also change the template, so it's not as ugly to look at. LOL.

Till next time, signing off. –– KG.


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