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Aptana - Please Don't Suck Any Harder

I wrote this post after hours of frustration, trying to fix my broken environment, and losing valuable time on a project that was falling behind.

I now realize that the post was overly emotional, and probably not entirely fair to the Aptana team. I'll post updates here as I work through the issues to get my RadRails working again.

Comments

Adam Bard said…
I can't speak for the Mac version, but I haven't had stability problems on either my Linux or Windows machine. The Linux one was using ridiculous CPU for a while, but I switched to Sun-Java and that seemed to sort it out.

That said, it's certainly not the best for anything but Javascript. But doesn't Mac have better Rails options anyhow?
Unknown said…
Adam, there are certainly options. IntelliJ IDEA now has support for ruby, but IDEA is not free. TextMate is the tool of choice for the majority of Rails developers, but I personally always preferred the integrated multi-window environment. That said, I am pretty much switching to TextMate now, but unfortunately not because of free will but because I have to get some work done :)
Unknown said…
Hi Konstantin,

I'm sorry to hear that you're having issues and I'd like to help. As part of our RadRails release, we spent a significant amount of time adding many new features and fixing existing bugs with the goal of giving people a great Rails development environment.

It sounds as if Aptana Studio may have had an issue with some old configuration information when you re-installed. You might try the steps here to see if it solves your issue:

http://www.aptana.com/node/251

We're mostly Mac users here. I'm trying out the latest version of the standalone version on OS X 10.5.2 and I'm unable to reproduce the Apple-Shift-R issue, so any help in reproducing the problem so we can fix the issue would be greatly appreciated.

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